0negirlarmy:

Haruka are u fucking serious

grimsdark:

The next time a guy complains about being friendzoned, send him this picture.

grimsdark:

The next time a guy complains about being friendzoned, send him this picture.

hippity-hoppity-brigade:

polytropic-liar:

modern day icarus with burns on his back and full of bitterness and throws out cynicism but sometimes he just looks at the sun like it’s the best thing in the world  (◡‿◡✿)

image

kodmaeda:

rainy weather and thunder doesn’t make me gloomy at all it’s more like, fuck yeah this is my kingdom of darkness and i’m the queen

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress
1910-1912
The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 
Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:


I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

mumblingsage:

yamino:

iamingrid:

yamino:

omgthatdress:

Half-Mourning Dress

1910-1912

The Victoria & Albert Museum

What’s a “half-mourning” dress?  Mourning in the front, party in the back?

Half-Mourning was the third stage of mourning for a widow. She would be expected to mourn her husband for at least two years, the stages being Full Mourning, Second Mourning and Half-Mourning. The different stages regulated what they would be wearing, with Full Mourning being all black and with no ornamentation, including the wodow’s veil, and the stages after that introducing some jewellery and modest ornamentation. When in Half-Mourning you would gradually include fabrics in other colors and sort of ease your way out of mourning. 

Wow, I am happy you made that joke so I could interpert it as a serious question and have an excuse to ramble on about clothing customs of the past, I am a historical fashion nerd.

That’s very informative, but I’m going to stick with my original head canon:

image

I love both the informed fashion history and the hilariously off-the-wall halves of this post.

electrikmoonlight:

Kristen is tired of shitty girl power movies

I apologize to Kirsten Stewart for all the times I made fun of her acting in twilight

ima-losechester:

princess—kennymccormick:

its-not-freedom—its-freestyle:

I love these things, I couldn’t resist

jaclcfrost:

living in a small town is wonderful

  • are there a lot of modes of transportation? nope! you either drive or you’re out of luck basically
  • are there a lot of job opportunities? no! of course not
  • are there things to do? hang out at the grocery store or go to the only movie theater the town has!
  • are the people nice? of course not! not at all!
  • are you close to anything interesting? nope! everything interesting happens hours away and you’re stuck in the middle of nowhere

theconspiracyroom:

Sherlock AU -  Mr and Mrs Smith

- See, we’ve been married for five years.
- Six.
- Five, six years.

this is fuckin hilarious. ohmyogd. a++ captions. all it needs is a cheesy soundtrack.

taylorpotato:

misscontraption:

mitunathehelicaptor:

tagging nsfw is hilarious like it’s just like you’re in a room with a shitload of people and you shout PORN and then some people cover their eyes and others stare at you in anticipation

image

mulodyne:

kids0ftheblackhole:

good

a headline from my perfect world

soilleir:

Roché pastels were used by Degas, Whistler, Vuillard and others.